Saturday, September 13, 2008

Mrs Justa on time

" If I could save time in a bottle, this first thing that I'ld like to do, is to >>>" How would you finish that sentence? image I am pondering this as I hear the tons of news reports going over the devastation from this most recent hurricane. And thinking of those who chose to stay behind, to challenge the storm, those whose lives may in danger, and I wonder what they would save if they could save time in a bottle.

Would it be the challenge of fighting a force much bigger then we are? Would it be special moments with a friend, a loved one, a moment , what would it be?

For me, I would save times of freedom from stress, I would save minutes with precious people that have passed on, I would save my sons laughter as a toddler and child, I would save cuddling him at night and reading to him. I would save the moment I met Mark, and the moment I meant my first husband, the moment I graduated from nursing school, watching my son graduate from high school, watching him and Adrianne graduate from college, Watching them both marry the love of their lives, the first time I held Brandon,sitting on my dads lap ( God I miss him so), my mom's wisdom, having good friends, feeling wanted. That would be what I would save in a bottle. How about you? My prayers that you treasure those special moments, Cindy

8 comments:

Stephany said...

I would end the sentence with the song's sentence: "save everyday like a treasure". If we live this way, we will have all of those memories we cherish.

I can still hear my kids laughter and see them running in parks with those little toddler legs!

When having hard times, and for me it's been an intensely painful 3 years with my daughter in and out of psych wards for months at a time...it's good to remember simple good days, like when my kids were little.

Take care,
Stephany

Mark Krusen said...

Stephany, Your daughter is lucky she has your support. It can be Hell for both the person going through the mental illness crisis and the support people in their lives. Some people do not know what to say to either, so they do not say anything, and I think they makes each the patient and the family or loved ones feel alone.
Mental Health is so real, and I feel that society will not accept that. The care that Mark got as an in pt was not therapeutic- per say-
it was suppose to be a safe haven, but when people with various issues are locked on a floor to exist, it sometimes becomes not so safe.
I do not know what the answers are- but I do know, people like you make it so much better for someone suffering with mental health issues. Thanks , Cindy

Stephany said...

I understand very much Cindy. My daughter was in unsafe psychiatric hospitals for several months at at time, and this last Oct 2007 a hosp doctor wanted to send her to the state institution (locked up)because he said she "has no hope" and that was at age 19! Ive been inside at least 6 psych hospitals, and have horror stories.

Society in general looks the other way, and over time, I have had friends leave too.

It's a sad commentary on our society, because the care SHOULD be good, and considering how many people suffer with mental illness, it's unbelievable we don't have a good system in place.

Anyone with mental illness is fortunate to have support, just as Mark has yours.

I'd like to know what he thinks of his experience in a psych unit, because if it's anything like my daughter's...it was all med based and therapy? bead bracelet making! They also deprived her of outside fresh air time, if she refused meds.

Anyway, I am glad he is home, that makes all the difference in the world for recovery. (and a routine at home helps sometimes too).

Take care both of you,

Stephany

Mark Krusen said...

stephany,
Marks opinion of the in pt adventure the first time, was he was never going back in, but after about 1 wk out he was back in again. The second time he did reiterate that he was not going to go back in pt again.
There was a lobby where ther was a tv/vcr- and anyone could use it, but there was lack of respect for people watching whatever, and someone else might come in and change it. There was not structured programs, a psychiatrist or social worker would briefly talk to the patients. There was group type settings each day, that were very encouraged to go to.
People were heavily medicated, so many had a zombie like walk and stare glance in their eyes. I can not blame the staff totally, I am sure the funding does not support involved programs.
There were limited visiting hrs, which made it tough for working people to visit, and one episode of a patient attacking a staff member.
The mental health programs in pt just seemed to provide a roof over the patient's head, and food. Thanks for your comment:) Cindy

Stephany said...

Cindy,

This is what I have had to deal with( and worse) alongside my daughter for 3 years, and my heart goes out to you both.

I'm just glad he is home. :)

Take care,

Stephany

Mark Krusen said...

stephany,
Sorry I did not go on line for a few days, I have been terribly busy at work, and a few nights I got home late, just vegged in the living room with Mark :) My thoughts and prayers are with you and your daughter. Love Cindy

Stephany said...

Thank you Cindy. Cherish the time with Mark, you'll both make it through this OK.

Mark Krusen said...

You too! Mark is here at home, and I do cherish every day, CIndy